Neasham Road Surgery
186 Neasham Road Darlington County Durham DL1 4YL
Tel: 01325 461128
Fax: 01325 469123
Out of Hours: 111


Newsletter
March  2018                        
 

SPRING HAS SPRUNG! SO HERE ARE A FEW THINGS FOR YOU TO REMEMBER.

1. ORDER YOUR PRESCIPTIONS IN PLENTY OF TIME AND REMEMBER THEY TAKE UP TO 3 DAYS TO PROCESS.
2. WE WILL CLOSE AT 6.00 P.M. ON THURSDAY 29TH MARCH AND REOPEN AT 7.30 A.M. ON TUESDAY 3RD APRIL FOR EASTER.
3. WE WILL BE CLOSED ON MONDAY 7TH MAY AND MONDAY 28TH MAY FOR THE SPRING BANK HOLIDAYS.
4. WE WILL DISPLAY THE PHARMACY OPENING TIMES FOR   DARLINGTON OVER EASTER VERY SOON.
5. IF YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY OR NEED MEDICAL ADVICE WHEN WE ARE CLOSED PLEASE RING 111.
 
AWARENESS DAYS
These are day/weeks that national charities choose to highlight and promote the good work they do in raising awareness about conditions that affect us.
April 25th is Allergy and MS awareness week. 2nd May is World Asthma day. 15th May is mental health awareness week. Look out for posters and information on how you can help.
 
DNAs
254 regular appointments were not attended in the past month. This means over 42 hours of GP and nurse time was wasted. Please always cancel if you cannot make it to your appointment.
 
STOP SMOKING – NO SMOKING DAY WAS 7TH MARCH BUT ANY DAY IS A GOOD DAY TO QUIT.

         www.darlingtonstopsmokinghub.org.uk
 
SCREENING SERVICES

The NHS provides a variety of screening services. They help detect early signs of illness.

Cervical screening
Cervical screening is offered to women aged 25 to 64 to check the health of cells in the cervix. It is offered every three years for those aged 26 to 49, and every five years from the ages of 50 to 64.
Breast screening
Breast screening is offered to women aged 50 to 70 to detect early signs of breast cancer. Women over 70 can self-refer.
Bowel cancer screening
There are two types of screening for bowel cancer.
A home testing kit is offered to men and women aged 60 to 74.
Bowel scope screening uses a thin, flexible tube with a tiny camera on the end to look at the large bowel. It is offered to men and women at the age of 55 in some parts of England.
Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) screening
AAA screening is offered to men in their 65th year to detect abdominal aortic aneurysms (a dangerous swelling in the aorta). Men over 65 can self-refer.
 
HAYFEVER
Hay fever is usually worse between late March and September, especially when it's warm, humid and windy. This is when the pollen count is at its highest.
Symptoms of hay fever include:

  • sneezing and coughing
  • a runny or blocked nose
  • itchy, red or watery eyes
  • itchy throat, mouth, nose and ears
  • loss of smell
  • pain around your temples and forehead
  • headache
  • earache
  • feeling tired

 
If you have asthma, you might also:

  • have a tight feeling in your chest
  • be short of breath
  • wheeze and cough

Hay fever will last for weeks or months, unlike a cold, which usually goes away after 1 to 2 weeks.
Do

  • put Vaseline around your nostrils to trap pollen
  • wear wraparound sunglasses to stop pollen getting into your eyes
  • shower and change your clothes after you've been outside to wash pollen off
  • stay indoors whenever possible
  • keep windows and doors shut as much as possible
  • vacuum regularly and dust with a damp cloth
  • buy a pollen filter for the air vents in your car and a vacuum cleaner with a special HEPA filter

Don't

  • cut grass or walk on grass
  • spend too much time outside
  • keep fresh flowers in the house
  • smoke or be around smoke – it makes your symptoms worse
  • dry clothes outside – they can catch pollen
  • let pets into the house if possible – they can carry pollen indoors

A pharmacist can help with hay fever
Speak to your pharmacist if you have hay fever. They can give advice and suggest the best treatments, like antihistamine drops, tablets or nasal sprays to help with:

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    PLANNING YOUR HOLIDAYS

    From travel insurance to vaccinations, here's what to think about before you travel.
    Start preparing for your trip, especially long trips, four to six weeks before you go.
    Read the latest health and safety advice for the country you're travelling using:

    Find out if you need travel vaccines and make sure your vaccinations are up-to-date.
    If diseases such as malaria are a risk, you may need to start treatment before travelling.
    Prepare a kit of travel health essentials, including sunscreen, painkillers and antiseptic. 
    Consider taking condoms with you to avoid the risk of buying fake, and potentially unsafe, brands when you get there.
    Sun protection
    When choosing sunscreen, the bottle's label should have:

    • the letters "UVA" in a circle logo and at least four-star UVA protection
    • at least SPF15 sunscreen to protect against UVB

    Travel insurance
    Whether you're off on a six-month trek to the Himalayas or a family holiday in Spain, it's vital to have the right travel insurance.
    Make sure your policy covers your destination and the duration of your stay, as well as any specific activities you might do.
    When travelling in Europe, make sure you have a valid European Health Insurance Card (EHIC).
    The EHIC will entitle you to free or reduced-cost medical care. However, it won't cover you for everything that travel insurance can, such as emergency travel back to the UK.
    Deep vein thrombosis 
    If you think you may be at risk of developing deep vein thrombosis (DVT), seek advice from your GP.
    On long-haul flights, get up from your seat to walk around and stretch your legs whenever you can. Drink regularly, but avoid alcohol, and wear loose, comfortable clothes. 
    Jet lag
    Jet lag is worse when you move from west to east because the body finds it harder to adapt to a shorter day than a longer one.
    Travelers who take medication according to a strict timetable, such as insulin or oral contraceptives, should seek medical advice from a health professional before their journey.hy and watery eyes and sneezing

  • a blocked nose

     
     
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